Wednesday, 29 August 2018

Call for Applications: Globelics Academy 2018: The 13th International PhD School on Innovation and Development

Globelics Academy 2018: The 13th International PhD School on Innovation and Development
3rd to 8th December 2018, Tshwane, South Africa

Event Details
The thirteenth International Doctoral Academy of Global Network for the Economics of Learning, Innovation, and Competence Building Systems (GLOBELICS) will be convened from the 3rd December until the 14th December 2018 in the City of Tshwane, in the Republic of South Africa. The 2018 edition of the International GLOBELICS Doctoral Academy is organised by the Institute for Economic Research on Innovation (IERI) of Tshwane University of Technology which co-hosts the DST-NRF Centre of Excellence in Scientometrics and Science, Technology and Innovation Policy (SciSTIP) together with the Centre for Research on Evaluation, Science and Technology (CREST) of Stellenbosch University.
The International GLOBELICS Doctoral Academy specifically aims to enhance the capacities, capabilities, and competencies of doctoral candidates who are undertaking theoretically-informed and policy-relevant empirical studies on innovation, learning, and the interactive dynamics of competence-building for development. In the context of the concurrent, global and interconnected challenges confronting contemporary world-systems, participants are expected to gain critical insights into the complex processes of sustainability and in framing emergent alternative futures.  The broad theme of the 15th International GLOBELICS Doctoral Academy will be "National Systems of Innovation in the Next (also known as the 4th) Industrial Revolution: Conceptual Challenges and Policy Implications".  The training will be based on critical keynote addresses, scholarly lectures, and presentations from the selected candidates. Student presentations are expected to focus explicitly on their on-going research, methodological challenges, and their contributions to the advancement of knowledge on innovation.

To qualify for participation, the PhD candidate should fulfil the following four requirements:
  • Registration at a recognised degree-granting higher education institution as a Doctoral candidate;
  • Successfully defended their Research Proposal and be at least in their second year of study;
  • Research Proposal explicitly covers issues related to science, technology, innovation, and development;
  • Capacity and capability to present an original academic paper derived from their doctoral studies.
Student selection will be based upon evaluation of (1) an Extended Abstract of four pages describing the candidate's research, (2) the applicant's C.V., and (3) a recommendation letter from the supervisor and/or from another senior scholar. Participants will be selected on the basis of the alignment of their doctoral research with the theme of the 13th International GLOBELICS Doctoral Academy. A maximum of fifteen (15) participants will be selected for the 2018 edition.  Selection aims at encouraging participation from countries of the global South. Applicants from and based in OECD member states are not excluded but may be required to cover some of their costs whilst those from lower-middle- and low-income countries can apply for supportive funding.

Extended Abstracts must be typed double-spaced in English using a 12-point Time-Roman font. They must include research objectives, methodology, expected results, and emergent conclusions, from their Doctoral research, including supporting figures, and references (this could be in addition to the four-page limitation). Extended Abstracts and Applications should be sent, by the 1st October 2018, to the Local Secretariat Office (e-mail: MadiaIL[@]tut.ac.za).  If approved, students must provide their full academic paper by no later than the 15th November 2018.  Funding will be selectively awarded on the basis of applications – students must specify in their application letter whether they require funding and provide an estimate of the least-cost amount required for travel expenses. As available funds cannot cover all students' expenses, all applicants are encouraged to raise their own funding.

New Article "Emerging Technologies and Innovation Policies in India: How Disparities in Cancer Research Might be Furthering Health Inequities?" by Rajesh K & PN Desai

Emerging Technologies and Innovation Policies in India: How Disparities in Cancer Research Might be Furthering Health Inequities?
by Rajesh Kalarivayil & Pranav N. Desai, Journal of Asian Public Policy, 2018, DOI: 10.1080/17516234.2018.1511219.

Abstract: Inequity in health research is understood as a major impediment to development. The paper uses empirical analysis performed on a unique data set of publications and clinical trials related to cancer research to explore the public policy dimensions of health care research in India. It traces disparities that result from predilections in science technology and innovation policies in India. The paper analyses disparity in health research using emerging technologies and its implications for equity in health research. The paper argues that the use of emerging technologies in cancer research has shifted research focus from cancers affecting poor population in India.


Scientometrics paper "China's Rising Leadership in Science and Technology: Quantitative and Qualitative Indicators"

China's Rising Leadership in Science and Technology: Quantitative and Qualitative Indicators
by Aparna Basu, P. Foland, G. Holdridge, RD Shelton; Scientometrics, 2018, 117(1): 249–269.

Abstract: China has a long and proud history of world leadership in science and technology, but in the past two centuries it has experienced a period of instability that has challenged that leadership. However, since its political consolidation in the middle part of the 20th Century and its subsequent economic reforms, China's rise in science has been meteoric. This rise was first detected by the scientometric community through its indicators, but it has now become obvious. Indeed in 2017 the question, "Will China come to lead world science?" was becoming to some, "Does China already lead world science?" This paper tries to make the case that the answer is "yes" (or at least "soon")—but the answer depends on which metrics one considers. China already leads many countries in some measures of GDP, scientific paper production, researchers, plus high technology manufacturing and exports. China also recently passed the European Union in R&D investment. Even in some of those indicators where China has not yet taken the lead, reasonable forecasts predict that it soon will. However, there are some indicators where China is still far behind. For example while rising, it still lags the U.S. and EU in citations in Western publications, and will take years to catch up. Here, these quantitative measures are supplemented by qualitative ones from WTEC assessments and by survey results of scientists and the public, which present a more nuanced conclusion. While Chinese leadership may be difficult for Westerners to accept, it can be viewed as China merely regaining its historical position of leadership in science and technology.
Keywords: World leadership Science Technology China Indicators Peer review 

Friday, 24 August 2018

Looking Back | Report of the Western Ghats Ecology Expert Panel | Prof. Madhav Gadgil Panel Report.

Report of the Western Ghats Ecology Expert Panel, Part I.
Report of the Panel of Experts under the Chairmanship of Prof. Madhav Gadgil, submitted on 31 August 2011 to the Ministry of Environment and Forests (MoEF&CC), Government of India. 

Preface
India is remarkable for the deep and abiding concern demonstrated by its people and its successive Central, State and local Governments towards halting the rapid pace of degradation of the environment. Our country has been a pioneer in the area of integrating the needs of development with the desire to protect the environment, as reflected in the emphasis on sustainable development as a key feature of the development strategy of the nation since the Fourth Five Year Plan of the country in the early 1970s. The constitution of the Western Ghats Ecology Expert Panel by the Ministry of Environment and Forests of the Government of India is yet another reflection of the seriousness with which our country views these significant challenges.
The Western Ghats are naturally an important focus of sustainable development efforts. The protector of the Indian peninsula, the mother of the Godavari, Krishna, Netravathi, Kaveri, Kunthi, Vaigai and a myriad other rivers, Kalidasa likens the Western Ghats to a charming maiden; Agastyamalai is her head, Annamalai and Nilgiri the breasts, her hips the broad ranges of Kanara and Goa, her legs the northern Sahyadris. Once the lady was adorned by a sari of rich green hues; today her mantle lies in shreds and tatters. It has been torn asunder by the greed of the elite and gnawed at by the poor, striving to eke out a subsistence. This is a great tragedy, for this hill range is the backbone of the ecology and economy of south India. Yet, on the positive side, the Western Ghats region has some of the highest levels of literacy in the country, and a high level of environmental awareness. Democratic institutions are well entrenched, and Kerala leads the country in capacity building and empowering of Panchayat Raj Institutions. Goa has recently concluded a very interesting exercise, Regional Plan 2021, of taking inputs from Gram Sabhas in deciding on land use policies. Evidently, the Western Ghats constitutes an appropriate region of the country to attempt to make the transition towards an inclusive, caring and environment-friendly mode of development.
It is therefore with tremendous enthusiasm that the Western Ghats Ecology Expert Panel has approached its appointed task. The Panel embarked upon the assignment through a multi- pronged strategy which included (i) compilation of all readily available and accessible information on the Western Ghats, (ii) development of a geospatial database on ecological sensitivity for the entire Western Ghats region which would provide a multi-criteria decision support system for demarcation of ecologically sensitive areas, and (iii) comprehensive consultations with principal stakeholders which included civil society groups, government officials, and peoples' representatives, ranging from members of Gram Panchayats and Zilla Parishads to MLAs and MPs.
It is noteworthy that in all these endeavors special effort was made to have wide-ranging discussions with complete transparency. All the information generated by the Panel including the geospatial database is publicity available through a dedicated website created for the Panel.
During the course of the last one and half years, Western Ghats Ecology Expert Panel has had fourteen Panel meetings wherein the Panel deliberated at length on various issues related to the Western Ghats region. The detailed minutes of all these meetings are available on the Ministry's website. These meeting were interspersed with brainstorming sessions, public consultations and field visits. The central stream of thought was to develop a sound scientific methodology/basis for arriving at decisions, with these decisions deliberated upon by adopting a participatory approach.
The report embodies among other things (i) categorization of the Western Ghats into three zones of varied ecological sensitivity, based upon careful analysis done by WGEEP, (ii) broad sectoral guidelines for each of these zones, and (iii) a broad framework for establishment of the Western Ghats Ecology Authority.
In this endeavor, the Panel has utilized the expertise of a number of people and organizations to whom the panel expresses its gratitude. The Panel thanks the Ministry of Environment and Forests, Government of India, for giving it this unique opportunity to be part of a very significant initiative directed at conserving the natural heritage of the Western Ghats – a global biodiversity hotspot.
Prof. Madhav Gadgil | Chairman, Western Ghats Ecology Expert Panel



See Also:

Thursday, 23 August 2018

New Report | Making India 5G Ready.

Making India 5G Ready.
Report of the 5G High Level Committee, submitted on 23rd August 2018 to the Department of Telecommunications (DoT), MeitY, Government of India. 

Executive Summary
5G is the next generation of cellular communications technology with evolutionary and revolutionary services that can have a deep impact on India. 5G can unleash new economic opportunities and societal benefits giving it the potential for being a transformational force for Indian society. It can help the country leapfrog the traditional barriers to development as well as advance the 'Digital India' vision. The cumulative economic impact of 5G on India can reach one trillion USD by 2035. A 5G High Level Forum was set up by the Government in September 2017 to articulate the Vision for 5G in India and to recommend policy initiatives and action plans to realize this vision. 
The three priorities for India in 5G are (a) Deployment – rolling out early, efficient and pervasive 5G networks to maximize the value offered by this new technology; (b) Technology – building India's industrial and R&D capacity in the design and IP dimensions of 5G; (c) Manufacturing - expanding the manufacturing base in 5G for both semiconductor fabrication as well as assembly & test plants. 
A Steering Committee was constituted with Prof. A J Paulraj, Professor, Stanford University as the Chair. During the HLF meetings, the High Level Forum focused on Deployment as the initial thrust area. Seven task forces were set up under the Steering Committee to study - Spectrum Policy, Regulatory Policy, Education and Awareness Promotion Program, Application & Use Case Labs, Development of Application Layer Standards, Major Trials and Technology Demonstration and Participation in International Standards. This report was prepared by the Steering Committee on behalf of the High Level Forum.

Table of Contents
  • Introduction and Background
(a) Wireless Networks in India
(b) 5G – The Next Generation Network
(c) 5G – Relevance to India
(d) 5G – Networks and Enabling Technologies
  • Key Recommendations
(a) Spectrum Policy
(b) Regulatory Policy
(c) Education and Awareness Promotion Program
(d) Application & Use Case Labs
(e) Participation in International Standards
(f) Technology Demonstration and Major Trials
(g) Development of Application Layer Standards
  • Action and Monitoring Plan
(a) Organizational Framework
(b) Action Plans
(c) Budgetary Recommendations

See Also:

New Report | A Free and Fair Digital Economy: Protecting Privacy, Empowering Indians

A Free and Fair Digital Economy: Protecting Privacy, Empowering Indians.
Report of the Committee of Experts under the Chairmanship of Justice B.N. Srikrishna, submitted on 27th July 2018 to Ministry of Electronics and Information Technology (MeitY), Government of India. 

About the Report
Recognising the importance of data protection and keeping personal data of citizens secure and protected, Ministry of Electronics and Information Technology (MeitY), Government of India, had constituted a Committee of Experts on 31st July 2017 under the Chairmanship of Justice B N Srikrishna, Former Judge, Supreme Court of India and comprising of members from Government, Academia and Industry to study and identify key data protection issues and recommend methods for addressing them. In December 2017, the Committee had put out a White Paper on Data Protection Framework for India, and had sought public comments and suggestions on it. Submission of responses to the White Paper was received till 31st January, 2018.  
On 27th July 2018, the Committee handed over its final report to Information and Technology Minister Ravi Shankar Prasad. The report comprises recommendations, including on what personal data is, the consent requirements for using such data, and the penalties for misuse of personal data. The Committee also suggested a draft Data Protection Bill. Protection of Data is expected to provide big boost to Digital economy of the country..

Table of Contents (9 chapters)
  • Chapter 1: A Free and Fair Digital Economy
  • Chapter 2: Jurisdiction and Applicability
  • Chapter 3: Processing
  • Chapter 4: Obligations of Data Fiduciaries
  • Chapter 5: Data Principal Rights
  • Chapter 6: Transfer of Personal Data Outside India
  • Chapter 7: Allied Laws
  • Chapter 8: Non-Consensual Processing
  • Chapter 9: Enforcement

See Also:

Monday, 6 August 2018

New Book | Innovation, Regional Integration, and Development in Africa: Rethinking Theories, Institutions, and Policies

Innovation, Regional Integration, and Development in Africa: Rethinking Theories, Institutions, and Policies
edited by Samuel Ojo Oloruntoba and Mammo Muchie, Springer, 2018, ISBN 9783319921792, 9783319921808. 

About the Book
This book discusses the role of innovation and regional integration in economic development in Africa. Over the past five decades, post-colonial African countries have struggled to break loose from the trap of poverty and underdevelopment through the adoption of various development strategies at regional, national, and continental levels. However, the results of both national and regional efforts at advancing development on the continent have been mixed. Although the importance of agglomeration and fusion of institutions have long been recognized as possible path to achieving economic development in Africa, the approach to regionalism has been unduly focused on market integration, while neglecting other dimensions such as social policy, mobility of labor, educational policy, biotechnology, regional legislation, manufacturing, innovation, and science and technology. This volume argues that the immediate and long term development of Africa lies not just in the structural transformation of its economies but in the advancement of scientific and innovation capacities.
The book is divided into four parts. Part I addresses the theoretical and conceptual underpinnings of innovation and regional integration in Africa. Part II presents case studies which examine how regional economic institutions are fostering innovation in Africa. Part III of the book deals with sectoral issues on innovation and integrated development in Africa. Part IV sets the future research on innovation, regional integration, and development in Africa. Combining theoretical analysis and a comparative, interdisciplinary approach, this volume is appropriate for researchers and students interested in economic development, political economy, African studies, international relations, agricultural science, and geography, as well as policymakers in regional economic communities and the African Union.

Table of Contents (21 chapters)
  • Reframing the Debates on Innovation and Regional Integration in Africa | Samuel Ojo Oloruntoba
  • Part I Theories and Concepts of Innovation and Regional Integration 
  • Networked System of Innovation for African Integrated, Smart and Green Development | Mammo Muchie
  • Innovation and Regional Integration in Africa: Exploring Theory and Praxis for Socio-Economic Development | Samuel Ojo Oloruntoba
  • Innovating the Political Economy of Pan Africanism: Imagination and Renaissance | Abu Girma Moges, Mammo Muchie
  • Innovating Policy and Systems of Innovation for Regional Integration | Christopher C. Nshimbi
  • Transnational Simultaneity: An Emerging African Perspective of Cross-Border Lifestyle | Adebusuyi Isaac Adeniran
  • Knowledge Valorisation for Inclusive Innovation and Integrated African Development | Saidi Trust
  • Part II Regional Institutions and Innovation in Africa
  • Regional Integration Prospects, Challenges and Opportunities in Africa: A Case of the Tripartite Free Trade Area | Moorosi Leshoele
  • The Regionalism-Innovation Nexus: The ECOWAS Experience | Adeoye O. Akinola
  • Institutional Capacity and Regional Integration: Reflections on the Composition and Powers of the ECOWAS Parliament | Ikenna Mike Alumona, Stephen Nnaemeka Azom
  • Innovation and Economic Development in West Africa: The Challenges of Implementing ECOPOST in Nigeria | Adetola Odubajo
  • The Role of Cloud-Based mHealth Disease Surveillance System in Regional Integration: A Case of the Ebola Crisis in ECOWAS | Lang Loum, Dikeledi A. Mokoena
  • Higher Education, R&D, and Challenges in National Innovation System Building of Angola | Eurico JosuĂ© Ngunga
  • Part III Sectoral Innovation and Integrated Development in Africa
  • Regional Integration and Knowledge Flows: Effect on Manufacturing Productivity in Southern Africa | Alexis Habiyaremye
  • Regionalism and Failure of the African Manufacturing Sector: Technology Transfer Policies as a Missing Link | Deus Costantine Shirati
  • Intra-African Trade and Innovation in the Agricultural sector | Foluso Akinsola, Motunrayo Akinsola
  • Unemployment and Informal Entrepreneurship in Zimbabwe: Implications for Regional Integration | Kingstone Mujeyi, Wilbert Zvakanyorwa Sadomba
  • Analysis of Agricultural Innovation and Decision Making among Maize Farming Household in Nigeria: A Gender Approach | Opeyemi E. Ayinde, Tahirou Abdoulaye, Mammo Muchie, Oluwafemi O. Ajewole
  • Social Innovations as a Response to Municipal Failures in Africa | Innocent Chirisa, Liasion Mukarwi, Abraham R. Matamanda, Aaron Maphosa
  • Science and Technological Capability Building in Global South: Comparative Study of India and South Africa | Swapan Kumar Patra, Mammo Muchie
  • Part IV Conclusion: Setting Research Agenda for Innovation and Integrated African Development 
  • Conclusion: Setting Research Agenda for Innovation and Integrated African Development | Samuel Ojo Oloruntoba, Mammo Muchie

Saturday, 4 August 2018

Call for Nomination: NIAS-DST Training Programme for Women Scientists (under DISHA Scheme) on "Science and Sustainability in India"

NIAS–DST Training Programme for Women Scientists (under DISHA Scheme) on "Science and Sustainability in India"
September 3 – 7, 2018
at National Institute of Advanced Studies (NIAS), Bangalore, India

Invitation for Nomination
Sustainability has an important place in the enterprise of research, policy and advocacy. Indeed, it is central to quality of life for current and future generations. Evolution and rapid ascendance of sustainability as a concept and a way of life signals numerous shifts in solutions to contemporary challenges. Current engagements with sustainability have enabled imaginations and drive towards a synthesis of diverse perspectives and a deepened interpretation of connectivity amongst science, technology, ethics and society. 
Given that issues of sustainability have transcended disciplines and expert domains, it would be fruitful to understand how the diverse spheres such as academia, policy making, activism, education and advocacy are incorporating concerns of sustainability. An inquiry into the emergence of the discourse on sustainability in the Indian context would lead to a series of questions: 
  • How is scientific research and progress connected to the theories and practices of sustainability?
  • What can the considerations of sustainability inform us about scientific practice and the processes of knowledge production?
  • How can sustainability education be developed and promoted?
  • How do we understand the relationship between sustainability and development?
  • How has the national policy framework paid attention to matters of sustainability?
These are some of the questions that form the crux of the course that is being organised by National Institute of Advanced Studies (NIAS) Bengaluru. This Course is supported by the Department of Science and Technology (DST) as a part of the initiative "DISHA Programme for Women in Science" and is a week-long training programme. The Course will include a combination of invited and inhouse lectures delivered by scientists, administrators, scholars, teachers, social scientists, scholars of humanities and artists. This Course will be held in NIAS from September 3 – 7, 2018, and is meant exclusively for Women Scientists and Technologists working in India.
The importance of Science and Technology and its connection to national development is hardly contested. The centrality of science and technology in modern India can be seen in the tremendous work of institution building across the country since independence. Rigorous training and high quality research have been the markers of many of our institutions. While we started out late, inclusion of women in the enterprise of science and technology is of utmost importance. Historically, women have entered the domains of science in small numbers, due to a range of reasons. There exists, however, a huge potential for talent among women. Participation of women in science faces two major challenges in India: access to higher levels of training in science, and mechanisms to retain women in scientific institutions. 
For over a decade, NIAS has been drawing attention to the need of building professional development models and instituting formal mechanisms so that the scientific power is not lost. The institution is fully committed to creating opportunities for interaction, collaboration and capacity enhancement for women scientists through a range of mechanisms and the training programme under DISHA scheme offers such a platform. 
For the training programme the institute seeks applications from Mid-level women scientists with minimum experience of 9 years onwards upto 21 years from diverse scientific institutions and universities. The programme will be organised around 5 themes and will involve lecture demonstrations, audio-visual contents, group discussions and sessions focusing on professional development. NIAS firmly believes that sustainability as an approach and for effective implementations needs the minds and commitment of best of women scientists as individuals and their networks. Our understanding and determination is enhanced multifold by the responses from the speakers and participants of earlier courses. 
As a premier institution in the country engaged in research and development, NIAS is an excellent place to conduct a training programme on sustainability and science. Building on its strength in various disciplines and advocacy issues, NIAS offers a unique multidisciplinary perspective that lends itself well to the complex questions of sustainability. NIAS is also fully committed to supporting women scientists and scholars in their professional domains. Situated on the beautiful green campus of the Indian Institute of Science (IISc), NIAS offers excellent library resources and access to scholars working on issues of contemporary relevance. Overall, the training course at NIAS is designed and delivered to leave an imprint and motivation in the professional lives of women scientists. 

Last date for receiving nominations: August 10, 2018.

For further information contact: 
National Institute of Advanced Studies, Indian Institute of Science Campus, Bengaluru 560012, Telephone: 080-22185025, Email: niasdstws@gmail.com


Call for Nomination: NIAS-DST Training Programme on "Policy for Science and Science for Policies" | 1-5 October | NIAS Bangalore

NIAS-DST Training Programme on "Policy for Science and Science for Policies"
October 1 to 5, 2018
at National Institute of Advanced Studies (NIAS), Bangalore, India

Invitation for Nomination
The National Institute of Advanced Studies (NIAS) has been organizing with support from the Department of Science and Technology (DST), Government of India, training programmes to provide the orientation and planning skills required for scientists/technocrats of the country, and in particular, to offer views of the broader scientific, economic, social and cultural milieu in which the Indian scientific enterprise could develop in this century.  The large pool of scientific and technical manpower in many Indian institutions has not had the benefit of either induction training or a system of regular in-service training that is available to other cadre-based services.  In order to bridge this gap, this Programme which is now seventh in the series for scientist-administrators and technologists at the Directors/Divisional Heads/Chief Scientists/Senior Scientists position from various scientific organizations in the country will focus on the theme 'Policy for Science and Science for Policies'. The Programme will be conducted during October 1 to 5, 2018. Consistent with the mission of NIAS, its programmes emphasize the development of leadership qualities through the integration of multidisciplinary knowledge. 

About the Training Programme
The training programme includes several technical lecture sessions (including the Inaugural and Valedictory function), and cultural programme. There will be a session on Yoga practice in the mornings.  The defining feature of lecture pattern in our programmes consists is the interactive session with distinguished faculty drawn from different organisations and occupations. The general format is a presentation for 45 minutes followed by discussions for 45 minutes. The participants would be encouraged to interact in-depth as much as possible with the speakers. The programme will draw speakers from across the nation to address some of the following topics:
  • Information Technology and Robotics
  • Science Policy and Security
  • Science Policy, Education and Culture
  • Energy Policies and Climate Change
  • Science and Society
  • Science and Communication
More information about the lectures will be provided to the nominated participants.

Infrastructure: Situated on five acres of land within the verdant campus of the Indian Institute of Science, the buildings of NIAS have a strikingly distinctive architecture with elegant lines and arched corridors. The fully furnished guest rooms make the visitors' and programme participants' stay a pleasant one. NIAS organizes a variety of programmes and public events. The campus of NIAS is often admired for its peaceful and green environs, an atmosphere conducive to research.
The facilities of NIAS include JRD Tata Auditorium, Lecture Hall, Conference Halls, Guest Rooms, Dining Hall and Green House for open-air activities. These facilities are used from time to time for various activities of the Institute and when they are not being used by the Institute it is available for others.
Since the programme is residential, NIAS will arrange boarding and lodging facilities.  In view of this guideline, it is necessary that all the participants stay in the campus. The outstation participants will be received at the Bengaluru airport.

Nominations: The Programme participants will be from various institutions like DST, DRDO, DAE, ISRO, ICMR, ICAR, CSIR, DSIR, and Universities. No participation fee is involved for attending this essentially residential programme.  Only the travel expenses to Bengaluru and return are to be met by the nominating organizations as stipulated by DST.  Participation in this Programme is limited to 25 individuals.  
Last date for receiving nominations: August 31, 2018.

National Institute of Advanced Studies, Indian Institute of Science Campus, Bengaluru 560012, Telephone: 080-22185025, Email: niaspssp.dst@gmail.com

Friday, 3 August 2018

UGC (Promotion of Academic Integrity and Prevention of Plagiarism in Higher Educational Institutions) Regulations, 2018


University Grants Commission

Notification
University Grants Commission (Promotion of Academic Integrity and Prevention of Plagiarism in Higher Educational Institutions) Regulations, 2018
New Delhi, the 23rd July, 2018
F. 1-18/2010(CPP-II) | The Gazette of India: Extraordinary [Part III—Sec. 4]
Preamble
Whereas, University Grants Commission (UGC), as per UGC Act, 1956, is mandated to coordinate and determine the standards of higher education; 
And whereas, assessment of academic and research work done leading to the partial fulfillment for the award of degrees at Masters and Research level, by a student or a faculty or a researcher or a staff, in the form of thesis, dissertation and publication of research papers, chapters in books, full-fledged books and any other similar work, reflects the extent to which elements of academic integrity and originality are observed in various relevant processes adopted by Higher Educational Institutions (HEIs);
Therefore, in exercise of the powers conferred by clause (j) of Section 12 read with clauses (f) and (g) of subsection (1) of Section 26 of the University Grants Commission Act, 1956, the University Grants Commission hereby makes the following regulations:-
1. Short title, application and commencement –
a. These regulations shall be called the University Grants Commission (Promotion of Academic Integrity and Prevention of Plagiarism in Higher Educational Institutions) Regulations, 2018.
b. They shall apply to the students, faculty, researchers and staff of all Higher Educational Institutions in the country.
c. These regulations shall come into force from the date of their notification in the Official Gazette.
2. Definitions -
In these regulations, unless the context otherwise requires—
a. "Academic Integrity" is the intellectual honesty in proposing, performing and reporting any activity, which leads to the creation of intellectual property;
b. "Author" includes a student or a faculty or a researcher or staff of Higher Educational Institution (HEI) who claims to be the creator of the work under consideration;
c. "Commission" means the University Grants Commission as defined in the University Grants Commission Act, 1956;
d. "Common Knowledge" means a well-known fact, quote, figure or information that is known to most of the people;
e. "Degree" means any such degree specified by the University Grants Commission, by notification in the Official Gazette, under section 22 of the University Grants Commission Act, 1956;
f. "Departmental Academic Integrity Panel" shall mean the body constituted at the departmental level to investigate allegations of plagiarism;
g. "Faculty" refers to a person who is teaching and/or guiding students enrolled in an HEI in any capacity whatsoever i.e. regular, ad-hoc, guest, temporary, visiting etc;
h. "Higher Educational Institution (HEI)" means a university recognized under section 2(f) of the UGC Act, 1956 or an institution deemed to be university under section 3 of the UGC Act, 1956 or an affiliating college/ institution or a constituent unit of a university;
i. "Information" includes data, message, text, images, sound, voice, codes, computer programs, software and databases or microfilm or computer generated microfiche;
j. "Institutional Academic Integrity Panel" shall mean the body constituted at Institutional level to consider recommendations of the departmental academic integrity panel and take appropriate decisions in respect of allegations of plagiarism and decide on penalties to be imposed. In exceptional cases, it shall investigate allegations of plagiarism at the institutional level;
k. "Notification" means a notification published in the Official Gazette and the expression "notify" with its cognate meanings and grammatical variation shall be construed accordingly;
l. "Plagiarism" means the practice of taking someone else's work or idea and passing them as one's own.
m. "Programme" means a programme of study leading to the award of a masters and research level degree;
n. "Researcher" refers to a person conducting academic / scientific research in HEIs;
o. "Script" includes research paper, thesis, dissertation, chapters in books, full-fledged books and any other similar work, submitted for assessment / opinion leading to the award of master and research level degrees or publication in print or electronic media by students or faculty or researcher or staff of an HEI; however, this shall exclude assignments / term papers / project reports / course work / essays and answer scripts etc.;
p. "Source" means the published primary and secondary material from any source whatsoever and includes written information and opinions gained directly from other people, including eminent scholars, public figures and practitioners in any form whatsoever as also data and information in the electronic form be it audio, video, image or text; Information being given the same meaning as defined under Section 2 (1) (v) of the Information Technology Act, 2000 and reproduced here in Regulation 2 (l);
q. "Staff" refers to all non-teaching staff working in HEIs in any capacity whatsoever i.e. regular, temporary, contractual, outsourced etc.;
r. "Student" means a person duly admitted and pursuing a programme of study including a research programme in any mode of study (full time or part-time or distance mode);
s. "University" means a university established or incorporated by or under a Central Act, a Provincial Act or a State Act, and includes an institution deemed to be university under section 3 of the UGC Act, 1956;
t. "Year" means the academic session in which a proven offence has been committed. Words and expressions used and not defined in these regulations but defined in the University Grants Commission Act, 1956 shall have the meanings respectively assigned to them in UGC Act, 1956.
3. Objectives
3.1 To create awareness about responsible conduct of research, thesis, dissertation, promotion of academic integrity and prevention of misconduct including plagiarism in academic writing among student, faculty, researcher and staff.
3.2 To establish institutional mechanism through education and training to facilitate responsible conduct of research, thesis, dissertation, promotion of academic integrity and deterrence from plagiarism.
3.3. To develop systems to detect plagiarism and to set up mechanisms to prevent plagiarism and punish a student, faculty, researcher or staff of HEI committing the act of plagiarism.
4. Duties of HEI:
Every HEI should establish the mechanism as prescribed in these regulations, to enhance awareness about responsible conduct of research and academic activities, to promote academic integrity and to prevent plagiarism.
5. Awareness Programs and Trainings:
(a) HEI shall instruct students, faculty, researcher and staff about proper attribution, seeking permission of the author wherever necessary, acknowledgement of source compatible with the needs and specificities of disciplines and in accordance with rules, international conventions and regulations governing the source.
(b) HEI shall conduct sensitization seminars/ awareness programs every semester on responsible conduct of research, thesis, dissertation, promotion of academic integrity and ethics in education for students, faculty, researcher and staff.
(c) HEI shall :
i. Include the cardinal principles of academic integrity in the curricula of Undergraduate (UG)/Postgraduate (PG)/Master's degree etc. as a compulsory course work/module.
ii. Include elements of responsible conduct of research and publication ethics as a compulsory course work/module for Masters and Research Scholars.
iii. Include elements of responsible conduct of research and publication ethics in Orientation and Refresher Courses organized for faculty and staff members of the HEI.
iv. Train student, faculty, researcher and staff for using plagiarism detection tools and reference management tools.
v. Establish facility equipped with modern technologies for detection of plagiarism.
vi. Encourage student, faculty, researcher and staff to register on international researcher's Registry systems.
6. Curbing Plagiarism
a) HEI shall declare and implement the technology based mechanism using appropriate software so as to ensure that documents such as thesis, dissertation, publications or any other such documents are free of plagiarism at the time of their submission.
b) The mechanism as defined at (a) above shall be made accessible to all engaged in research work including student, faculty, researcher and staff etc.
c) Every student submitting a thesis, dissertation, or any other such documents to the HEI shall submit an undertaking indicating that the document has been prepared by him or her and that the document is his/her original work and free of any plagiarism.
d) The undertaking shall include the fact that the document has been duly checked through a Plagiarism detection tool approved by the HEI.
e) HEI shall develop a policy on plagiarism and get it approved by its relevant statutory bodies/authorities. The approved policy shall be placed on the homepage of the HEI website.
f) Each supervisor shall submit a certificate indicating that the work done by the researcher under him / her is plagiarism free.
g) HEI shall submit to INFLIBNET soft copies of all Masters, Research program's dissertations and thesis within a month after the award of degrees for hosting in the digital repository under the "Shodh Ganga e-repository".
h) HEI shall create Institutional Repository on institute website which shall include dissertation/ thesis/ paper/ publication and other in-house publications.
7. Similarity checks for exclusion from Plagiarism
The similarity checks for plagiarism shall exclude the following:
i. All quoted work reproduced with all necessary permission and/or attribution.
ii. All references, bibliography, table of content, preface and acknowledgements.
iii. All generic terms, laws, standard symbols and standards equations.
Note: The research work carried out by the student, faculty, researcher and staff shall be based on original ideas, which shall include abstract, summary, hypothesis, observations, results, conclusions and recommendations only and shall not have any similarities. It shall exclude a common knowledge or coincidental terms, up to fourteen (14) consecutive words.
8. Levels of Plagiarism
Plagiarism would be quantified into following levels in ascending order of severity for the purpose of its definition:
i. Level 0: Similarities upto 10% - Minor similarities, no penalty
ii. Level 1: Similarities above 10% to 40%
iii. Level 2: Similarities above 40% to 60%
iv. Level 3: Similarities above 60%
9. Detection/Reporting/Handling of Plagiarism
If any member of the academic community suspects with appropriate proof that a case of plagiarism has happened in any document, he or she shall report it to the Departmental Academic Integrity Panel (DAIP). Upon receipt of such a complaint or allegation the DAIP shall investigate the matter and submit its recommendations to the Institutional Academic Integrity Panel (IAIP) of the HEI.
The authorities of HEI can also take suomotu notice of an act of plagiarism and initiate proceedings under these regulations. Similarly, proceedings can also be initiated by the HEI on the basis of findings of an examiner. All such cases will be investigated by the IAIP.
10. Departmental Academic Integrity Panel (DAIP)
i. All Departments in HEI shall notify a DAIP whose composition shall be as given below:
a. Chairman - Head of the Department
b. Member - Senior academician from outside the department, to be nominated by the head of HEI.
c. Member - A person well versed with anti-plagiarism tools, to be nominated by the Head of the Department.
The tenure of the members in respect of points 'b' and 'c' shall be two years. The quorum for the meetings shall be 2 out of 3 members (including Chairman).
ii. The DAIP shall follow the principles of natural justice while deciding about the allegation of plagiarism against the student, faculty, researcher and staff.
iii. The DAIP shall have the power to assess the level of plagiarism and recommend penalty(ies) accordingly.
iv. The DAIP after investigation shall submit its report with the recommendation on penalties to be imposed to the IAIP within a period of 45 days from the date of receipt of complaint / initiation of the proceedings.
11. Institutional Academic Integrity Panel (IAIP)
i. HEI shall notify a IAIP whose composition shall be as given below:
a. Chairman - Pro-VC/Dean/Senior Academician of the HEI.
b. Member - Senior Academician other than Chairman, to be nominated by the Head of HEI.
c. Member - One member nominated by the Head of HEI from outside the HEI
d. Member - A person well versed with anti-plagiarism tools, to be nominated by the Head of the HEI.
The Chairman of DAIP and IAIP shall not be the same. The tenure of the Committee members including Chairman shall be three years. The quorum for the meetings shall be 3 out of 4 members (including Chairman).
ii. The IAIP shall consider the recommendations of DAIP.
iii. The IAIP shall also investigate cases of plagiarism as per the provisions mentioned in these regulations.
iv. The IAIP shall follow the principles of natural justice while deciding about the allegation of plagiarism against the student, faculty, researcher and staff of HEI.
v. The IAIP shall have the power to review the recommendations of DAIP including penalties with due justification.
vi. The IAIP shall send the report after investigation and the recommendation on penalties to be imposed to the Head of the HEI within a period of 45 days from the date of receipt of recommendation of DAIP/ complaint/ initiation of the proceedings.
vii. The IAIP shall provide a copy of the report to the person(s) against whom inquiry report is submitted.
12. Penalties
Penalties in the cases of plagiarism shall be imposed on students pursuing studies at the level of Masters and Research programs and on researcher, faculty & staff of the HEI only after academic misconduct on the part of the individual has been established without doubt, when all avenues of appeal have been exhausted and individual in question has been provided enough opportunity to defend himself or herself in a fair or transparent manner.
12.1 Penalties in case of plagiarism in submission of thesis and dissertations Institutional Academic Integrity Panel (IAIP) shall impose penalty considering the severity of the Plagiarism.
i. Level 0: Similarities upto 10% - Minor Similarities, no penalty.
ii. Level 1: Similarities above 10% to 40% - Such student shall be asked to submit a revised script within a stipulated time period not exceeding 6 months.
iii. Level 2: Similarities above 40% to 60% - Such student shall be debarred from submitting a revised script for a period of one year.
iv. Level 3: Similarities above 60% -Such student registration for that programme shall be cancelled.
Note 1: Penalty on repeated plagiarism- Such student shall be punished for the plagiarism of one level higher than the previous level committed by him/her. In case where plagiarism of highest level is committed then the punishment for the same shall be operative.
Note 2: Penalty in case where the degree/credit has already been obtained - If plagiarism is proved on a date later than the date of award of degree or credit as the case may be then his/her degree or credit shall be put in abeyance for a period recommended by the IAIP and approved by the Head of the Institution.
12.2 Penalties in case of plagiarism in academic and research publications
I. Level 0: Similarities up to 10% - Minor similarities, no penalty.
II. Level 1: Similarities above 10% to 40%
i) Shall be asked to withdraw manuscript.
III. Level 2: Similarities above 40% to 60%
i) Shall be asked to withdraw manuscript.
ii) Shall be denied a right to one annual increment.
iii) Shall not be allowed to be a supervisor to any new Master's, M.Phil., Ph.D. Student/scholar for a period of two years.
IV. Level 3: Similarities above 60%
i) Shall be asked to withdraw manuscript.
ii) Shall be denied a right to two successive annual increments.
iii) Shall not be allowed to be a supervisor to any new Master's, M.Phil., Ph.D. Student/scholar for a period of three years.
Note 1: Penalty on repeated plagiarism - Shall be asked to withdraw manuscript and shall be punished for the plagiarism of one level higher than the lower level committed by him/her. In case where plagiarism of highest level is committed then the punishment for the same shall be operative. In case level 3 offence is repeated then the disciplinary action including suspension/termination as per service rules shall be taken by the HEI.
Note 2: Penalty in case where the benefit or credit has already been obtained - If plagiarism is proved on a date later than the date of benefit or credit obtained as the case may be then his/her benefit or credit shall be put in abeyance for a period recommended by IAIP and approved by the Head of the Institution.
Note 3: HEIs shall create a mechanism so as to ensure that each of the paper publication/ thesis/ dissertation by the student, faculty, researcher or staff of the HEI is checked for plagiarism at the time of forwarding/ submission.
Note 4: If there is any complaint of plagiarism against the Head of an HEI, a suitable action, in line with these regulations, shall be taken by the Controlling Authority of the HEI.
Note 5: If there is any complaint of plagiarism against the Head of Department/Authorities at the institutional level, a suitable action, in line with these regulations, shall be recommended by the IAIP and approved by the Competent Authority.
Note 6: If there is any complaint of plagiarism against any member of DAIP or IAIP, then such member shall excuse himself / herself from the meeting(s) where his/her case is being discussed/investigated.
13. Removal of Difficulty
UGC reserves the right to remove difficulty/difficulties in the course of implementations of these Regulations in consultation with the Government of India/ Ministry of Human Resource Development.
Prof. Rajnish Jain, Secy.
[ADVT.-III/4/Exty./161/18]
The Gazette of India: Extraordinary [Part III—Sec. 4]
Uploaded by Dte. of Printing at Government of India Press, Ring Road, Mayapuri, New Delhi-110064 & Published by the Controller of Publications, Delhi-110054.
See Also:
Das, A.K. (2018). Plagiarism and Research Integrity. Presented in the 1st Refresher Course in E-Learning & E-Governance (Interdisciplinary), July 30, 2018 at UGC-Human Resource Development Centre (HRDC), Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi.